Archive for May, 2011

PHRASAL VERB


phrasal verbs
A verb that consists of a main verb plus an adverb. Phrasal verbs can be transitive or intransitive. For example:
intransitive
transitive
back away
carry out
catch on
dig up
hold on
leave behind
settle down
spell out
Transitive phrasal verbs
The adverb can come before or after the object:
They’ve dug up a lot of human bones at my old uncle’s house.
They’ve dug a lot of human bones up at my old uncle’s house.
But if the object is a personal pronoun it normally comes before the adverb:
They should have left him behind.
If the object consists of a fairly long noun phrase, it is usually more convenient to place it after the adverb — otherwise the reader is left waiting for the completion of the verb. Compare these two versions of the same sentence:
Mr Lamont spelled out the tactics behind the battle for the pound.
Mr Lamont spelled the tactics behind the battle for the pound out.
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PREFIX MEANINGS


prefix meaningskoo.i
prefix
meaning
example
a-
not, not affected by
amoral
ante-
before
antecedent
anti-
against
anti-pollution
arch-
chief
arch-rival
auto-
self
autobiography
bi-
two
bipartisan
bio-
(from biology)
biodiversity
circum-
around
circumference
co-
joint, together
co-worker
contra-
opposite
contradiction
counter-
against
counteract
crypto-
hidden
crypto-fascist
de-
making the opposite of
demystify
demi-
half
demigod
di-
two
dialogue
dis-
making the opposite of
disagree
du-/duo-
two
duologue
eco-
(from ecology)
eco-tourism
Euro-
(from European)
Eurodollar
ex-
former
ex-husband
out of
extract
fore-
in the front of, ahead of
forerunner
hyper-
very big
hypermarket
in-
not, opposite of
inexact
in, into
insert
inter-
between
inter-state
intra-
inside
intravenous
mal-
bad(ly)
maladministration
mega-
very large
megastar
mid-
middle
midlife
midi-
medium-sized
midi-length
mini-
small
minimarket
mis-
wrong, false
misadventure
mono-
one
monogamy
multi-
many
multi-layered
neo-
new
neolithic
non-
not, opposite of
non-partisan
out-
beyond
outreach
over-
too much
overreach
para-
ancillary
paramedic
beyond
paranormal
poly-
many
polymath
post-
after
post-election
pre-
before
pre-election
pro-
for
pro-gun
deputy
proconsul
pseudo-
false
pseudo-intellectual
re-
again
rerun
back
reverse
retro-
backwards
retrograde
self-
self
self-sufficient
semi-
half
semi-serious
sub-
below
sub-zero
super-
more than, special
superhuman
supra-
above
suprasensuous
sur-
more than, beyond
surreal
tele-
at a distance
television
trans-
across
trans-Siberian
tri-
three
tripartite
ultra-
beyond
ultraviolet
very much indeed
ultra-careful
un-
not, opposite of
unnecessary
reversal, cancellation
untie
under-
below, less than
underachieve
uni-
one
unitary
vice-
deputy
vice-chancellor

QUESTION:1.Have you seen ‘Romeo and Juliet’? 2.Did you see ‘Romeo and Juliet’? What’s the difference between 1 and 2? send ur ans:9347847048


1/2:We use the  pre. perf. when we r thinking of a  period  of time up to now,even if we do not mention it. (1.Have you ever seen it?..up to now)
1/2:We use the  pre. perf. when we r thinking of a  period  of time up to now,even if we do not mention it. (1.Have you ever seen it?..up to now) From:PRACTICAL ENGLISH  USAGE BY MICHAEL SWAN

1) still he has the memories of the movie.  2) he doesn’t have any sweet things. It should be followed by the past time phrase.  -PRAVEEN

2.Hv u seen… Means 2 cases r posible 1 is recently 2 is u saw it many yrs back, but stil u rember d contents, action etc. If any1 asks u ‘hv u seen…?’ means ‘do u rembr it stil’. Did u see means…. U saw it and forgot it, no idea stil.
By-surendra mohan

3.If romeo n juliet still live we use first one..if they are not now( dead ) we use second one  BY::
4 1.recently completed action 2.completed action  …            … by Durgam

5.”Have u seen” indicats the present  action where as “did u see” indicates the past action.  M. Srihari SA(Eng) ZPHS Rechaplly.

6.1.present perfect.2.simple past. Your friend,E.RATNAKER REDDY.

7.1)Today morning matter (Present perfect tense)
2)Yesterday r complet past.
(Simple past)

8.
1. Present perfect. For Just completed action  2. Simple past. The action completed in the past i.e. Yesterday last week last month r last year
9.Have u seen Romeo and Juliet ?  Means.. here.. Romeo and Juliet is existing now and there is chance to see now.
Did u see Romeo and Juliet ? Means Roeo and Juliet not existing now and there is no chance to see now

10.1) it means that you know r & j as- persons
2) it means that whether you have heArd of r&j PLAY

CLAUSE


clause
▶ n
1. (grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence
Hypernyms: construction
Hyponyms: main clause, coordinate clause, subordinate clause, relative clause, double indemnity
Holonyms: sentence
Related words: grammar, clausal
2. article – a separate section of a legal document (as a statute or contract or will)
Hypernyms: section
Hyponyms: arbitration clause, deductible, escalator clause, joker, reserve clause, rider
Holonyms: document
Related words: contract, article

FINITE VERB


finite verb
A form of the verb that is complete in itself and can be used alone as the verb phrase in a sentence. In the sentences that follow there is one finite verb, which is printed in bold type:
Then I examined the three main rooms.
Science tells us about the structural and relational properties of objects.
The finite form of the verb is either the simple past tense (as in the first example) or the simple present tense (as in the second example). The sentences that follow do not contain finite verbs; the verbs in bold type are non-finite:
Habit of appearing to stand on tiptoe, stretching the neck.
So kitsch, frozen in time.
If the verb phrase in a sentence consists of more than one verb word, then one of the verbs should be finite. In the sentences that follow, the verb phrase is printed in italics and the finite verb is in bold:
Magazine editors in 1955 were hit by the same problem.
The jazz scene must have sounded to Parker like a musical hall of mirrors.

CONSONANTS


consonant
Writing
There are 21 consonant letters:
b c d f g h j k l m n p q r s t v w x y z
Speech
In speech a consonant is a sound that is made by blocking the flow of air while speaking. For example, the first sound in the word mark is made by closing the lips briefly, while the last sound is made by pressing the blade of the tongue up against the hard palate. There are 22 consonants in spoken English. They are the first sounds in each of the following words:
bat
char
cut
dip
fat
gut
hot
jar
late
meet
neat
pat
rate
ship
sip
that
thing
tip
vat
zip
plus the sounds in the following words marked by letters in bold type:
measure  sing
Two other sounds are sometimes called consonants and sometimes semivowels. They are the first sounds in these words:
win  young

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