Archive for November, 2011

INTERJECTIONS


Interjections:

Hi! That’s an interjection. 🙂

“Interjection” is a big name

for a little word. Interjections

are short exclamations like

Oh! , Um or Ah! They have no

real grammatical value but

we use them quite often,

usually more in speaking than

in writing. When interjections

are inserted into a sentence,

they have no grammatical

connection to the sentence.

An interjection is sometimes

followed by an exclamation

mark (!) when written.

Here are some interjections

with examples:

interjection

meaning

example

ah

expressing pleasure

“Ah, that feels good.”

expressing realization

“Ah, now I understand.”

expressing resignation

“Ah well, it can’t be heped.”

expressing surprise

“Ah! I’ve won!”

alas

expressing grief or pity

“Alas, she’s dead now.”

dear

expressing pity

“Oh dear! Does it hurt?”

expressing surprise

“Dear me! That’s a surprise!”

eh

asking for repetition

“It’s hot today.” “Eh?” “I said

it’s hot today.”

expressing enquiry

“What do you think of that,

eh?”

expressing surprise

“Eh! Really?”

inviting agreement

“Let’s go, eh?”

er

expressing hesitation

“Lima is the capital

of…er…Peru .”

hello, hullo

expressing greeting

“Hello John. How are you

today?”

expressing surprise

“Hello! My car’s gone!”

hey

calling attention

“Hey! look at that!”

expressing surprise, joy etc

“Hey! What a good idea!”

hi

expressing greeting

“Hi! What’s new?”

hmm

expressing hesitation, doubt

or disagreement

“Hmm. I’m not so sure.”

oh, o

expressing surprise

“Oh! You’re here!”

expressing pain

“Oh! I’ve got a toothache.”

expressing pleading

“Oh, please say ‘yes’!”

ouch

expressing pain

“Ouch! That hurts!”

uh

expressing hesitation

“Uh…I don’t know the

answer to that.”

uh-huh

expressing agreement

“Shall we go?” “Uh-huh.”

um, umm

expressing hesitation

“85 divided by 5 is…um. ..17.”

well

expressing surprise

“Well I never!”

introducing a remark

“Well, what did he say?”

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Why This kolaveri (Tamil latest hit song)


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Real speech of Vivekananda


Real speech of Vivekananda

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Real speech of NETAJI


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WHERE THE MIND IS WITHOUT FEAR


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PARTS OF SPEECH


Parts of Speech Table

This is a summary of the 8

parts of speech*. You can

find more detail if you click

on each part of speech.

part of speech

function or “job”

example words

example sentences

Verb

action or state

(to) be, have, do, like, work,

sing, can, must

EnglishClub.com is a web

site. I like EnglishClub.com.

Noun

thing or person

pen, dog, work, music, town,

London, teacher, John

This is my dog. He lives in my

house . We live in London .

Adjective

describes a noun

a/an, the, 69, some, good,

big, red, well, interesting

My dog is big . I like big dogs.

Adverb

describes a verb, adjective or

adverb

quickly, silently, well, badly,

very, really

My dog eats quickly. When

he is very hungry, he eats

really quickly.

Pronoun

replaces a noun

I, you, he, she, some

Tara is Indian. She is

beautiful.

Preposition

links a noun to another word

to, at, after, on, but

We went to school on

Monday.

Conjunction

joins clauses or sentences or

words

and, but, when

I like dogs and I like cats. I

like cats and dogs. I like dogs

but I don’t like cats.

Interjection

short exclamation,

sometimes inserted into a

sentence

oh!, ouch!, hi!, well

Ouch ! That hurts! Hi! How

are you? Well, I don’t know.

* Some grammar sources

categorize English into 9 or 10

parts of speech. At

EnglishClub.com, we use the

traditional categorization of 8

parts of speech. Examples of

other categorizations are:

Verbs may be treated as

two different parts of

speech:

Lexical Verbs (work,

like, run )

Auxiliary Verbs ( be,

have, must )

Determiners may be

treated as a separate

part of speech, instead of

being categorized under

Adjectives

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Is it wrong to end a sentence with preposition?


Is It Wrong to End

a Sentence With a

Preposition?

Question: Is It Wrong to End

a Sentence With a

Preposition?

Answer:

Quite simply, no. A

preposition is not a bad word

to end a sentence with. Even

in your grandparents’ day a

preposition was not a bad

word to end a sentence with.

But ask a few of your friends

or colleagues if they

remember any rules of English

grammar, and almost

certainly at least one will say,

with confidence, “Never end a

sentence with a preposition.”

Bryan Garner wasn’t the first

to call that “rule” a

“superstition”:

The spurious rule about

not ending sentences with

prepositions is a remnant

of Latin grammar, in

which a preposition was

the one word that a

writer could not end a

sentence with. But Latin

grammar should never

straightjacket English

grammar. If the

superstition is a “rule” at

all, it is a rule of rhetoric

and not of grammar, the

idea being to end

sentences with strong

words that drive a point

home. That principle is

sound, of course, but not

to the extent of meriting

lockstep adherence or

flouting established

idiom.

(Garner’s Modern

American Usage, Oxford

University Press, 2003)

For over a century even hard-

core prescriptive grammarians

have rejected this old taboo:

Now that should be the end

of it, right? But just try

convincing that friend of

yours.

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